The Key to Reaching Millennial Moms

Millennial moms are quintessential millennial consumers: they take pride in their individuality and want to be heard by the brands they choose. Because millennial moms are busy multi-taskers, word-of-mouth marketing is a perfect way to connect with them. Here’s how to leverage this type of marketing to help moms make decisions about what’s best for them and for baby:

Offer A+ customer service

By offering exceptional customer service options—easily reachable support via phone or email, prompt responses to online inquires, video tutorials—you can validate millennial moms’ concerns and offer customized solutions. For example, UppaBaby offers real-time online “chat” support, easy-to-find phone numbers for live conversations, and a multitude of FAQ and video tutorial options. In fact, their representatives will even invite a customer to share a picture or video to illustrate their issue of concern. This hyper-specific customer service caters to millennials by letting them to chose how they receive support and lets UppaBaby show their clients that they view them as individuals with a unique set of problems. This high quality service is the kind of thing moms can’t help but mention to friends, easily building word-of-mouth marketing momentum for a beloved brand.

Make sharing easy

Millennial moms love to share. In fact, 94% of Facebook using parents share, post or comment, as opposed to just passively skimming content. By inviting millennial moms to share their opinion via online reviews, you can speak their social media-centric language. You’re even providing the forum for millennial moms to tell other customers what they think. Just check out the review sections on diapers.com or buybuybaby.com.

If you want to take it to the next level, you can respond publicly to a less than stellar review and offer a concrete remedy—even if it’s simply an invitation to continue conversation offline. This kind of accountability matters deeply to millennials. Strategies for sharing can be tailored for smaller retailers, too. A mom-and-pop shop may not have the client base to collect tons of online reviews for each product they sell, but they can directly link the products on their website to Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, etc. to encourage customers to share their feedback and experiences with their personal networks. By giving moms the chance and tools to share, you’re jump-starting word-of-mouth marketing and building buzz.

Go grassroots

Millennial moms are just like all of their mothers in one way: they trust and rely on other moms to help them make decisions about everything from daycare to diapers. By identifying key players in any given community of millennial moms, you have an “in” for word-of-mouth marketing. Check in with the leaders of mom groups in your town, owners of brick-and-mortar baby boutiques, or “Mommy & Me” fitness instructors. The people running these enterprises are ideal “ambassadors” to educate others about your brand and product; they’re typically new moms themselves and, more importantly, are talking with lots of new moms every single day. Give ambassadors something good to talk about, and they’ll drive the word-of-mouth marketing from there!

Sample, sample, sample

A quick way to get millennial moms talking about your product is to let them take it for a test-drive. Not only is it helpful for moms to try out a new item before buying, but letting them have a sample speaks volumes about how confident you are that they will love your product once they try it. Literally giving millennial moms something to talk about (i.e. a trial run with your product), will get them chatting with their friends and family about both your brand and your product.

While word-of-mouth marketing may seem like traditional marketing, it is uniquely useful when it comes to connecting with millennial moms. Use these pointers to breathe new life into your strategies and get moms talking about the next big thing.

Learn more about how Ovia Media can help you start the conversation with millennial moms.

This post was written by Ovia Media’s contributing author, Emily Madden.